Podcasts

Recently I’ve been listening to more podcasts and I find it interesting how different they all can handle a single subject. The recent subject I’ve chosen has been true crime. Now, I’m not familiar with a lot of true crime, so most of what is being said in jest or about particular people, I have no idea what they’re talking about, add on that I am an absolute dreg when it comes to names, and you have the making of an outsider.

If you’ve been a reader of my other blog, Quirni, then you know that my mother and I read together. She’s the one who introduced me to her favorite podcasts. One of them is two guys talking about true crime and they have a very systematic approach, the other is two girls talking about true crime  and they have a very chaotic approach, it’s more conversational. I see this as a reflection of the way that poetry works too because you have those who rhyme and structure and develop their poems completely and then publish them, and those who just throw something together and publish.

Or at least, that’s how it feels and I’m sure that the girls also have a method to their madness since they actually keep their podcasts to about the same length. That takes planning no matter what anyone says. You at least have to plan how long you want to make them and then actually stop when you hit that time.

For the moment, I don’t really want to call out the podcasts because I think it’s more entertaining to talk about how they’re speaking rather than talking about the subject matter, so it’s just going to be two girls, two guys.

So here’s a rough overview of my thoughts and I’ll do my  best to relate it to something you all care about, poetry.

Two Girls

The two women’s podcast has an outline that it follows, but it doesn’t actually plan what is going to be talked about together. Interestingly enough, both women come together to do the recording and have their own notes or idea of what they want to talk about, and then discuss it for however long one episode is.

They have a really round-about approach for how they talk about everything. They begin by just talking to one another, occasionally do corrections from the last show [they openly don’t research and ask their listeners to correct them nicely] and then getting all of the advertisements out of the way. Eventually the topic of true crime comes up naturally, because one of them can find something that relates to the story they want to share, and they get into the stories. Once one shares, the other does, and then they have a few things they do at the end of the show as well.

The thing I find really interesting is that these two discuss this in a very open and conversational manner. The way they discuss it is basically just “Oh my god, did you hear about …?” and even if the other one did know about it to some extent they’re always excited to talk about it.

I really like this style because it lets you feel like you’re just overhearing the conversation while in a cafe or somewhere that people talk. It makes me feel more like these are just two people talking rather than someone trying to inform me or gross me out.

While they’re discussing the murder, each of them are free to jump in and go on tangents and allow for that in the time of their podcast. They eventually get around to describing what happened, but it’s always with warnings such as “And this is really gross” or “If you’re eating, I’m sorry” as they break the fourth wall and address their silent audience frequently. The audience is someone sitting in on their conversation, however, and it’s primarily their conversation.

That’s way different from the two guys.

Two Guys

In the two guys podcast everything is very regimented. They have all of their advertisements up front and they get their plugging done for their products right away, such as products they advertise for other hobbies, and once that’s done, they’ll just bring it up if they want a break. Primarily, the podcast is all about the topic, whatever that is. They often spend a few hours on one subject too which can mean sometimes extending to two or three shows.

You can really tell that this show is planned out from subject to subject and the way they go about talking through their topic is very systematic. One episode might just be about the evidence they have on this person or that person, while another could be about a trial, or about who else it could have been.

They also have a speaker and a color commentator rather than two presenters. In this case the color commentator takes the roll of the audience completely. Whenever the speaker wants to address the audience, he addresses his co-producer. Occasionally he will mention “the people at home” but it’s usually in a detached way and the color commentator has to address the people at home himself.

This can be awkward like trying to write a blog without “you” because sometimes the color commentator will add more information about the case and the listener can tell that he knows exactly what he’s talking about, so there’s no reason to present to him in particular. It just is how they write the show.

There’s also much less time for side conversation in this podcast. They’re always on topic pretty much, and they stay to one crime, give or take the relevance to other crimes, and that’s pretty much it. They are much less likely to go off on tangents.

Comparing

Between the two podcasts, they both love to talk about crime and I’m pretty sure they both listen to one another, so it’s fun to see the differences in how they operate. The two guys are trying to be as accurate as they can be, while the two girls are being very loose about their accuracy, but both of them end up with the same information in the end and both of them have to make corrections.

While the one is more conversational, the other is more like a radio show, or something where you are an audience which isn’t involved in the discussion at all. The other includes the audience on a regular basis either talking about what they’ll think, or what they might be doing, going as far as to talk about what the people in jail that they’re talking about might be doing as well. They’re completely aware that people who commit these crimes might be listening to their podcast.

I find it interesting that with two very different approaches, they both garner the same audience. They both are interesting to my mother and that’s not just because she has a lot of time to listen. She enjoys true crime, and while she’s actually supported the two guys’ podcast, I think the reason she hasn’t supported the two girls is only because they have less merchandise out and about advertised on their podcast. The two girls advertise tickets to live shows rather than stuff with a logo on it.

Relating to Poetry

These are by far two types of poems written today. One school of thought is that you should be conversational with your poetry, talk to your audience, discuss what’s going on. This is huge for poets and writers like Billy Collins. The more you can discuss with your audience, even if it is one sided, the better your poem is to this school. I’d love to call them the Conversationalists and have it actually be a thing, but I’m not writing my masters final yet.

The other type is the type where people are talking about a moment in time, or discussing something with themselves or with a set audience in the poem. There are even poems which present a story and you’re just along for the ride. This is like the two guys podcast because they have an agenda that they’re trying to develop, just like the other style, but they do it by creating a captive audience, an audience without a voice.

If you’re reading a poem about nature, you’re probably not involved unless it’s saying something in the second person, and who does that? So I find it fascinating that it shows up in other forms of spoken word. There isn’t a binary choice here either. With two people running a podcast there could be any variety of styles including creepy music, reenactments, just sharing the facts and no speculation, sharing no facts but expecting everyone to already know about it, excluding the audience entirely, relying entirely on there being an audience, and all the intermediate answers. Poetry is the same way.

In poetry today there is a mix between the different types of poems out there from poems that directly speak to the audience, to those who are just reflections of ideas without any addressing of the audience at all. You can look at poets like the confessional poets and see how they became conversational, but it’s more than just one option.

As I keep listening to podcasts, I will be interested to hear the different varieties that are out there, and see how they affect my experience listening. Personally, I am in love with this conversationalist movement, so I will be happy to see it continue in podcasts and other types of media as trends shift and grow.

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Poetry in Schools

With all of the recent school shootings such as Florida and Maryland, I thought it was time to talk about what I do. I work in a school building M-F with kids who are usually none to happy to see me, struggling to find the best ways to communicate in the short time I have with each student.

I’m not a teacher, I’m an in-class tutor. That means I don’t teach class, but I do teach kids. I help kids who are not understanding lessons, or just have a difficult time not getting distracted. A lot of the times, I feel like a parole officer, and if I do get to teach kids during the day, it’s for a very short time, maybe a few minutes. Our system at my school isn’t perfect. There are other schools which have better systems for tutoring kids in need, but our system works for us, despite the hassle.

So how does this relate to Poetry Talking?

Well, April is coming up and for those of you who don’t know, that means National Poetry Month. I’m in two English classes. The problem? Neither one of them was planning anything for Poetry Month!

Why? Well, there is a huge variety of reasons but the main one was testing took up too much time, and they didn’t feel as though they had time to handle poetry. I think that’s a load of bull since poetry doesn’t need to be “dealt with” it just needs to be read, enjoyed, and move on.

Last year, I saw a young man writing poetry and while he called it “rap” that was just because poetry wasn’t considered ‘cool’ because it was totally a poem. People can be excited about poetry, and I know when I teach kids in April, I will be doing things with poetry to encourage understanding!

Poetry can help with so many critical thinking skills. In a single poem we can have at least two types of patterns to identify [rhyme and rhythm] and there are so many figures of speech!

I am happy to say that both classes have read poems once this year, but once is not much. So, this Poetry Month if you’re in the schools, I challenge you to “deal with” poetry just for a few minutes at the beginning or end of class. Read them something cool and fun that they would be interested in! There are emerging poets all the time who write on unique topics, and develop new messages, so poetry is just as likely to be over something as an article or a short story is.

Don’t cut it out of your curriculum just because you don’t think they’ll get it. Assume they’ll get it because it’s already in their day to day lives with every song they sing.

If you work in the schools, what are your plans for Poetry Month?

“To His Brooke.” Review

Edmund Spenser’s  “To His Brooke.”

For those of you who don’t happen to have a wonderful copy of The Yale Edition of the Shorter Poems of Edmund Spenser or those of you who have never heard of Edmund Spenser before you searched poetry on WordPress, here’s a copy of the poem I will be talking about.

To His Brooke.

Goe little brooke: thy selfe present,
as child whose parent was unkent:
To him that is the president
Of noblesse and of chevalree,
And if that Envie barke at thee,
As sure it will, for succoure flee
Under the shadow of his wing,
and asked, who thee forth did bring,
A shepheards swaine saye did thee sing,
All as his straying flocke he fedde:
And when his honor has thee redde:
Carve pardon for my hardyhedde.
But if that any aske thy name,
Say thou wert base begot with blame:
For thy thereof thou takest shame.
And when thou art past jeopardee,
Come tell me, what was sayd of mee:
And I will send more after thee.

Immeritô

With the text out of the way, I’d like to talk about the poem, but first, there’s one more order of business. I want to paraphrase the poem as well, so if you don’t want to read my paraphrase of the poem, skip the next speech box.

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Line Punctuation

Line Punctuation is one of the most common forms of punctuation for old styles of poetry. If you flip through an old poetry book, you’re going to run across it, and most teachers show poems with line punctuation first in their classes.

Why?

Line Punctuation Value

The value of line punctuation really breaks down to one thing, reading poetry. When a reader has line punctuation, they feel more at ease reading a poem if and only if they have a habit of stopping at the end of a line.

Since poetry used to be all about that sound, ’bout that sound, ’bout that sound, not written, the end of the line usually was the end of a sentence, or where a period, exclamation point, comma, dash, or other type of punctuation was sitting.

After all, when poetry was first transcribed and read in letter, it was meant to be read for those who were still illiterate for a long time afterwards. It wasn’t common to read poems in print, therefor the language had to be geared towards shorter lines with obvious beat and punctuation that assisted the reader to get it right each and every time, and the same each and every time.

Rhyming also has some support with line punctuation because the natural meter that line punctuation can provide, can help hide or stretch some of the rhymes that are weaker than others. Using line punctuation cannot make words like word and fear rhyme, but word and chard, yeah, it might hide that if you’re good.

Exceptions

There are some exceptions to the rule ‘punctuation at the end of every line’, like with everything. Line punctuation was never meant to be a strict thing, it was happenstance due to the meter and way that poetry was developing into a literary tool. For instance, when flipping through a book of Spenser, who is a poet around the mid to late 1500s before the standardization of a dictionary was widely accepted (1700ish), we have this poem:

To His Brooke.

Goe little brooke: thy selfe present,
as child whose parent was unkent:
To him that is the president
Of noblesse and of chevalree,
And if that Envie barke at thee,
As sure it will, for succoure flee
Under the shadow of his wing,
and asked, who thee forth did bring,
A shepheards swaine saye did thee sing,
All as his straying flocke he fedde:
And when his honor has thee redde:
Carve pardon for my hardyhedde.
But if that any aske thy name,
Say thou wert base begot with blame:
For thy thereof thou takest shame.
And when thou art past jeopardee,
Come tell me, what was sayd of mee:
And I will send more after thee.

Immeritô

As you can see, the poem is before the time when words were spelled like they are today. This is back around/before Shakespeare, and it has two lines that do not have punctuation at the end. “To him that is the president” and “As sure it will, for succoure flee” both lack a punctuation mark at the end!

This was during the time when punctuation at the end of a line was at it’s height, and the majority of his poems have the cadence that support punctuation falling at the end. So what can this tell us today? Well, that it’s not necessary even when using an older style to maintain strictly to having punctuation at the end of literally every line. There’s more to it than that.

Putting it Together

What line punctuation is good for is when you’re writing a poem with a certain meter [cadence] and you want to ensure that meter is being met. That means the writer is using those punctuation marks more like breath punctuation, or to follow the inflection of the poem, rather than just because it’s the end of a line.

Traditionally, meter ends at the end of the line with a strong or soft beat that feels like the end of the pattern, and therefore it ends up with end punctuation. This is when it’s typically supported the most by how the poem is read. If a poem doesn’t read with a meter, chances are it won’t look good, or sound good, with line punctuation.

  1. Not all lines need punctuation at the end
  2. Metered poetry supports line punctuation
  3. Rhymes also support line punctuation as rhymes can be part of metered poems
  4. Line punctuation supports a reader who wants to stop at the end of each line
  5. It can seem like a really old style for a poem.

Down Sides

The problem with using line punctuation might seem obvious to some of you by this point, especially those of you who are familiar with it from personal experience, but let me lay out how I’ve responded as a reader to line punctuation.

Most of the time, poets who are trying to be dramatic use line punctuation exclusively. They will write poems like:

My life is a lie …
I want to die …
If only,
If only,
I wasn’t so lonely.
No one loves me.
My cat hates me.
I want to drown in the sea!

And being someone who handles a lot of unpracticed poets, I am stuck trying to explain why it doesn’t have any emotion when they’re talking about suicide. So where do I begin? Personally, I start with structure because these lines are not beefy and that’s a big part of the problem.

Taking away the line punctuation doesn’t help this poem, by any means, but, after seeing a lot of poems like this, and writing a lot of them myself when I was at that delicate age of hating the world, I grew out of love with line punctuation. So the first thing I check whenever I read the poem as a critiquer is line punctuation and capitalization. If those two things are there, chances are, I’m not going to like this poem as much.

If the poem shows promise after I get by the first two lines, I try to struggle away my general dislike from years of handling poorly written line punctuated and capitalized poems, but it can be a struggle.

When I did Submission Reading for literary magazines, and when I do contests, these two things are top on the list of annoying things for most readers I was speaking to. Just to stand out, staying away from these two things can be a good idea. The third top thing was rhyming in poems.

That being said, don’t let it compromise your poem if the poem feels best with this formal style. Just know what battleground you’re entering if you want to submit it.

Should I Use it?

Yes!

I am a strong advocate for using anything and everything in your arsenal, so line punctuation is no different. The question should never be ‘should’, but ‘when’ because it has it’s time and place.

For instance, if you were writing a haiku, probably not the best time to use line punctuation. Haiku aren’t a style that benefit from the added structure because they started out with their own structure and rely on a couplet, and a turn.

However, if you are writing a villanelle, or a cinquain, or some other form of poetry that either requires meter and/or rhyme, using end punctuation and enjambment can create a completely new and unique atmosphere for an old style of poetry, or an older feeling to make it seem dated and antique.

The best thing for you to do as a poet is to experiment and read. The more you read, the more you’ll discover what touches your funny bone, kicks you in the shin, or gives you a back massage after a long day’s work. In other words, you’ll find what you like and what you don’t like. If you avoid writing the types of poems you don’t like, you’ll find an audience who likes what you like too.

After all, we’re a bit of a niche right now. Most people who read poetry are those who write it, so if you, as a writer, don’t like something, chances are your audience doesn’t either.

If you enjoyed reading about line punctuation, check out Quirni on Amazon Kindle to see how I utilize my poetic language in a full on science fiction adventure! Join Erica as she explores a whole new world in Book One and help support my blogging hobby by buying a copy.

Have a question? Write a comment!

I would love to hear from each and every one of you about your experiences with poetry, writing, fiction, or anything else on this blog! If you don’t find somewhere you feel comfortable commenting, leave it on my “About” page and I’ll get to it ASAP!

Thanks so much for reading, and stay subscribed for new updates!

Punctuation in Poetry

I mentioned during my segments on capitalization in poetry that I would go over punctuation in poetry in a similar manner. Well, the time has come so let’s dive in with getting an overview of all of the different types of punctuation I’ve seen in poetry. If you’ve seen more, please comment and write your post about your style of punctuation you’ve seen, and I’ll link it in this post! I’d love for this to be collaborative.

The types of punctuation I see most in poetry are what I’m going to call Line Punctuation, Sentence Punctuation, Breath Punctuation, or No Punctuation. This is not an exhaustive list so I’ll add in ‘Alternative’ Punctuation as a final catch-all category to show you some of the author specific methods. I will go over each one briefly but this article is mostly for naming and explaining what they all are. In later articles I’ll go over each one individually and those links will be edited into this article once those articles are posted.

Line Punctuation

First up is the traditional. Line Punctuation is for when a poem has end punctuation, or very standard punctuation for the syncopation of the poem.

The blue buds bloomed,
beneath the spring sun —
little heads peeking, slowly,
a tentative reach for warmth,
after the long winter.

They calmed into the nippy day,
as it warmed, their green shoots;
unprepared for night, they frosted.

The important thing to note is that not all lines end in just commas. Sometimes they get jumbled up with other punctuation types, but each and every line has punctuation at the end and the beat for each line is typically the same, or at least similar. This is most commonly seen in older styles of poetry.

Today some people see this end punctuation structure as naive because it can break up the flow of the poem, and hinder any real distance of a breath. You’re not reading through the lines to keep the reader interested in these poems, but pausing to contemplate each one. That takes longer as a reader, and sometimes it can lose interest.

The best place for this is when you’re trying to mimic a slower style of poetry, or an older style. If you’re using spoken word and you want each line to be impactful, it’s often a good thing to use as well because you don’t want your readers reading through the end of the line if the end of your lines are your important loud sounds.

Sentence Punctuation

This type of punctuation is based on the idea that poems are made up of sentences and it often pairs with Sentence Capitalization. Basically, if you would punctuate it in a paragraph, you punctuate it in the poem like that.

The blue buds bloomed beneath
the spring sun. Little heads peeking
slowly, a tentative reach for warmth
after the long winter.

They calmed into the nippy day as it warmed
their green shoots. Unprepared for night,
they frosted.

The example above is the same words, I just changed the punctuation to show you something fun you can do with sentence punctuation: enjambment. Because you aren’t constrained by having to end with punctuation, you can make different styles of liens and get a more varied experience with a poem using Sentence Punctuation.

This style is the most commonly used today for punctuation in poetry that I’ve seen due to the versatile nature and the general acceptance of grammar guidelines for any other form of writing applying. If you need a comma as a paragraph, you need a comma for a poem. Oftentimes this makes it easier for readers who are more unfamiliar with poetry to accept and read the poem as well due to the familiar nature.

Sentence Punctuation works best with poems that aren’t trying to rebel against anything, or show anything off aside from their words. If you want the punctuation to be in the background, this is a good choice.

Breath Punctuation

This is one of the less traditional methods of punctuation. Basically anywhere you pause while reading your poem, put a comma, anywhere you stop, put a period, and anywhere you feel like it, put whatever other type of punctuation you want. You need to be consistent with what you’re using the punctuation for, but after that, it doesn’t much matter.

The blue buds, bloomed, beneath
the spring sun. Little heads, peeking
slowly, a tentative reach, for warmth
after the long, winter.

They calmed, into the nippy day, as it warmed
their green shoots. Unprepared for night,
they frosted.

This style can be used for more dramatic readings and as a reminder if you’re reading spoken poem where you want your pauses to be. Oftentimes this type of punctuation will get comments that you’re using punctuation wrong however, if you’re on a poetry reviewing site. This could also be why I am slowly beginning to see more of it accepted into poetry magazines. It’s harder to see that the writer isn’t just using punctuation wrong, but the general guideline of it is very straightforward. Read it how the poet wrote it. Use the punctuation as guideposts as they are meant to be.

This is paired best with Sentence Capitalization or Breath Capitalization surprisingly enough because if you’re using either one, the punctuation pretty much falls together with the style. No Capitalization also works nicely with this, especially if you want to add just a touch of structure to your lack of capitalization.

No Punctuation

This style is one of the easiest to edit into a poem. Basically, any punctuation you use, take it out. There is some debate about leaving things like apostrophes and other spelling punctuation, so that is up to the poet.

The blue buds bloomed
beneath the spring sun
little heads peeking slowly
a tentative reach for warmth
after the long winter

They calmed into the nippy day
as it warmed their green shoots
unprepared for night they frosted

As you can see I went back to the line punctuation version of this poem to show you the effects and how this works. Without punctuation, our brains will automatically decide where we want to stop and start sentences, so naturally it’s a little easier to see the sentences if we have clear chunks that don’t have enjambment. Because of that, this style lends itself well to shorter lines which are usually just verb/noun/etc. phrases.

The effect on the reader can range depending on the style of capitalization you choose to pair with this particular style of punctuation, so this one is worth exploring. I’ve often found that it works best with dark or brooding poems, or poems that are showing some form of rebellion because we’re stripping away the societal norm of guidelines for how to read something, and imposing the reader’s choice. It can create multiple different ways to read a single poem and a lot of younger poets really love that aspect of this style. You can allow the reader to explore and really just step back into the audience as the poet.

Alternative Punctuation

Some more styles of punctuation that some people use are:

  • Ellipsis Punctuation: Putting . . . at the end of each line for dramatic effect.
  • Dash Punctuation: Look up Emily Dickinson.
  • Meter Punctuation: Do the same thing as breath, but for the meter strictly.
  • Image Punctuation: e. e. cummings style

And any more that you can find. These other styles are often specialized to a particular group of writer, so their presence really tells us that punctuation is fair game to play with in poetry. If we want to get published in a magazine, it might be smart to see what types of punctuation and capitalization they accept before we try to send in our poems, but as long as we have a purpose for our madness, it’s really no holds barred.

Applications in Poetry

When you’re trying to figure out what type of punctuation you want to use in a poem, the best thing to really do is try them out. Just like capitalization, if you don’t know how something will change things, write a poem, apply it to the poem, and re-read it once you have some fresh eyes. The change might be something you love, or it could be something you hate. It’s up to what type of mood and design you want to create on your page.

Just like Capitalization in Poetry provides the backbone of the emotion in a poem, the punctuation can drastically affect the muscular structure. Some poems use more complex language and sentence structure than others, and those poems could get confusing to read with less punctuation, or with a different style of punctuation than they were originally written. Likewise, some poems are written with clearer meanings without punctuation at all due to the variety of interpretations a reader can receive from the absence.

As a rule of thumb, and an easily broken one, if the poem has complex sentences, stick with a more complex punctuation strategy. If you need to legally use parentheses in your sentence, for instance, chances are you’re never going to be able to get rid of them without jimmying the lines.

Punctuation can be expressed through capitalization, lines, and stanzas however. Oftentimes without punctuation, a gap, such as a stanza break, is read as a full stop, and a comma is the end of the line until after the first readthrough. The same can be true when punctuation is available. Some readers can never get over reading a comma at the end of a line, and some will always stop for a pause between stanzas.

If you look at the examples I created, you can see that the punctuation makes you linger in the poem the most with Breath Punctuation and Line Punctuation. The poem reads the fastest with Sentence Punctuation and No Punctuation. This is because the punctuation forces the reader to pause and breathe which lets the words linger longer. Sometimes that’s good, sometimes that’s bad. It’s up to you to figure out what type of effect you want to create using the different styles you can see here.

And lastly, I’m no expert, so I’ll offer this. I’ve had years of playing with poetry, and I’ve had a few published, but if you see something counter to what I’m saying, let me know. I’d love to talk about it with you and edit this or link to your explanations if you’ve written one of these yourselves.

Here are some parting questions. I eagerly await your responses.

  1. Did this article help you see a different type of punctuation opportunity?
  2. Do you see something that’s different from your experience?
  3. What’s your favorite style of punctuation?
  4. What style do you want to see in more detail first?

Metaphorical Discussions

Hey guys, today I thought I’d look at metaphor since it’s something that is so heavily laced not only in poetry but in writing in general. Metaphors are something that are around us all day every day, but we never really pay them much mind. For instance, most idioms started out as metaphors. “The squeaky wheel gets the grease” comes from people having squeaky wheels on wagons. “Don’t rock the boat” comes from a time when fishing and boating was more prevalent.

So here are some things that school wouldn’t have taught you:

Metaphors are not always nouns related to one another. For instance “the truck washed through the traffic” is using a verb ‘washed’ for the metaphor. The truck can’t literally wash through anything, and washing out something is usually reserved for a river or a a washing machine of some sort. It still works as a metaphor because it’s descriptive and relatable. We often wouldn’t even qualify it as a metaphor because it’s so commonplace to use phrases like that. They often end up classified as personification too.

Metaphors are best used when relating very common situations. Think about one of the primary uses of metaphors, describing emotions, and consider some of your favorite. “My heart is a racehorse whenever I see her” is a good example of a metaphor with something abstract like love and something common like racehorses. Even if you’ve never actually been to the horse races, you know what they’re like. We’ve all seen them recreated on TV and in movies. We all know that concept. That’s what makes it a strong metaphor.

An entire poem can be a metaphor. Sometimes when writing a descriptive poem I find it fun to create a metaphor and stick with it for the entire poem. There is one I did recently about dust where I used the dust as a metaphor for my speaker throughout the poem. These can be enlightening because they give people a common object to look at and a complex object to relate it to.

Metaphors don’t always have to be bread and butter. By that metaphor I mean they don’t have to match perfectly every time. If I’m writing a longer metaphor, like the poem about dust, I like to work through the metaphor and lead the train of thought down the paths I need rather than the paths that don’t work. It’s all about finding a way to create an expectation away from notions that don’t fit with the metaphor.

You don’t have to use them! Even in poetry using metaphors is optional. If you don’t like them, you have their cousin similes which are just as useful as metaphors, although they don’t always pack the same punch. For example if we were writing a metaphor of someone’s life becoming horrible and saying it was like getting ripped apart by wolves, it’s a very different experience to literally have a man eaten by wolves, and to have his boss eat him like a wolf for a tension in a story.

Readers don’t have to understand or notice every metaphor. Not all readers are engaging with a story as something to analyze and that’s okay. Some of them just like to enjoy the pretty pictures. I know I do. That doesn’t mean you have to stop putting them in, it just means that you don’t have to be upset if they don’t see them. Also, sometimes metaphors come so naturally to a reader they won’t even notice you wrote it in. Those are the good ones.

It’s not necessary to only use real life things as metaphors. One of my favorite things to write are metaphors where the emotion or object we’re somewhat familiar with is actually describing an unknown new book specific thing in what feels like a reverse metaphor. For instance “His twisting mind was a jarraquin eating her lunch.” tells us more information about what “jarraquin” might be or mean rather than how his mind twisted. We know from personal experience what a “twisting mind” might look like and since we have a little context of “eating her lunch” we know this is probably an animal or a living thing of some sort. With “twisting” paired with it we can assume that it’s something that bends awkwardly and twists. This is one way we can clue in our readers using context clues in a very short description. We could even go on to say “his vivacious emotions are bright jarraquin plumage on his face” to add to a description of them using more vibrant words.

The last thing school might not have taught you about metaphor is that they’re great for arguments. If you want to argue with someone about something and you bring up a solid metaphor, oftentimes you can use it to support your argument through a wide variety of examples from the metaphor’s object and it will actually work until they realize they can say “yeah, but the man wasn’t eaten by wolves” to get out of it.

Do you have any tips for writing metaphors?
Do you have any metaphors you love to use?
Have you used a metaphor in a poem recently and you want to share?

Comment! I’d love to hear from you.

Finding Your Passion

One of the hardest things to capture as a writer is what you’re passionate about to keep writing consistently. Yeah, I’m talking about writers block.

There are literally hundreds of books on writers block out there. Seriously, I searched Amazon and I came up with about 400 results. Not all of those are books though. Several of them are journals rather than reading material.

For me, reading about solving writers block isn’t something that would help. The only way to really prove you don’t have writers block is to write. But, what do you write about? That’s what I want to talk about today.

Your Options

Here’s a list of things you can use to approach the “what do I want to write about” question.

To start, here are some questions geared to get you thinking about your passions.

  1. What do I love to hate?
  2. What do I talk about for way too long?
  3. Who was the subject of my last rant?
  4. What are my friends [or family] annoyed with me for talking about?
  5. How did [x] happen? [where x is something you keep thinking about]
  6. What was the most interesting thing I’ve heard recently?
  7. What was the last petition I signed?
  8. Who is my least favorite character of all time?
  9. If I list everything I do in a day, what gets me frustrated?
  10. What did I search most recently and why?

Another thing you could pick instead of passions is something random. Here are some prompts for finding a random thing to write about.

  1. Close your eyes.
    • Turn around once or just shake your head a few times.
    • Open your eyes.
    • First thing you see is the subject.
  2. Plug the word of the day into a rhyme dictionary and pick the third rhymed word.
    • That’s your word to either use as inspiration or directly.
    • If it doesn’t rhyme, use the word itself.
  3. Grab a book, or open your browser’s last history page.
    • Roll a 100 sided die and count to that word.
    • If it’s too high to count, like 100 or 99,
      • count the number of words per line
      • do a little math (your number divided by words per line) to find out how many lines down your number would be.
  4. What was the last thing you did physically?
    • That’s your prompt.
  5. Count how many pencils you can see.
    • then find a list of emotions
    • count down the list the number of pencils you counted.
    • Use that emotion.

If none of these prompts speak to you, you can roll a die using the dice roller I linked to earlier and a coin flipper. If the coin is heads, use the first list, if it’s tails, use the second. Then, roll the die and see what number prompt you get. If you get over 5 on the second list, pop up to the first list and use that number from there. If you don’t use a 10 sided die, you won’t get the last four prompts for the first list.

Once You Have a Subject

After you have a subject matter, writing could still end up being hard to do, so here’s how I deal with that. For me, it’s less about writing and more about accepting.

I often end up with writers block because I want to write something amazing, and I have to remind myself that failing isn’t a problem. I don’t have to write gold every time. So, if you’re feeling that same tension, I challenge you to write something bad. Give yourself the freedom to write poorly so you’re actually writing, and then do it a bunch. The more you take the trash out, so to speak, the more you’ll hone certain skills, like recognizing your own faults.

For me, I tend to use too many ‘s’ noises. I hop right to metaphors when I shouldn’t. I get a little preachy sometimes. I often change metaphors too fast. I also like to write poems with a mopey tone, and use obscure references that no one gets or that I invented.

I only know that because I’ve written bad poetry on purpose. I do it for a few reasons.

  1. It helps me identify what I think is bad.
  2. It shows off faults to look for in the future.
  3. Sometimes bad poetry can be made into a good theme.

On that last note, some of the poems that I wrote to be bad on purpose actually turn out pretty well. They need to be re-written, but they give me something to write about and that gives me focus. Once I have something I want to say, writing comes much easier.

That’s why I call it finding your passion rather than getting rid of writers block. We’re not removing a block on our creativity, we’re creating a riverbed to encourage our creativity to flow in the direction we want. In a sense, our creativity can stagnate in a lake and until it busts free, we’re stuck with the same ideas we wear at continuously. We have to find or create a new riverbed of passions to move away from our old beaten home.

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Connecting To Poetry

When I read new poets, I often have a hard time connecting with the poem. Part of that is on me, part of that is on the poet. I think it can be hard to connect with a work if we’re looking at it critically. The more critically we look at something, the more we examine it under a microscope, and microscopic organisms never really give us the big picture. A single piece of a 10,000 piece jigsaw puzzle can’t tell us what the picture is.

So what can we do to prevent a disconnect with our readership? After all, most people who read poems are poets themselves. It’s just statistics at this point. That means that our main audience is going to be asking themselves “are they worthy” every time they read our literature. So what do we do?

As A Poet

As someone who is writing poetry, I think we can protect ourselves by passing a few tests each time we write a new poem. These all come up in the editing stages of writing, and I’ll go into more detail when I get into editing poems.

  • “You’re not the boss of me!”
    • Instruction: Read your poem like a moody angry person who is talking to their equal or subordinate. If, at any point, you can shout at your poem “You’re not my mom” or “You’re not my boss” then that area needs reworking.
    • Explanation: Whenever a reader feels like they’re being bossed around, readers tune out. It doesn’t matter whether it’s because someone’s saying “You must” or “You should always” or one of those other imperative, commanding phrases. Talking about the right thing to do with a little too much passion can annoy a person.
  • “Well, I don’t … !”
    • Instruction: Read your poem and look for places where you assume a universal truth or fallacy. If you have assumed a universal truth/fallacy such as anything with “always” or “never” then take those words out.
    • Explanation: The only time when a universal truth is a good thing to use is when you’re being contrary on purpose, such as sarcasm or satire. In these situations it works well, but otherwise, you’re likely to turn a reader off, or disconnect with them, by using what you perceive as a universal law.
  • “What?”
    • Instruction: Paraphrase your poem! Take each line or sentence, and write it in plain English. Don’t use fancy language. Don’t use difficult words. Make it as simple and short as you can.
    • Explanation: Sometimes we get so caught up in our flowery language that we forget the meaning of the sentence. It’s good to take a step back and read over your poem in layman’s terms to ensure the poem actually means something and it isn’t just a bunch of pretty pictures.

It is good to leave uniqueness in your poem, but if you overdo it, the poem can be bogged down like an inside joke, so finding that careful balance between writing a poem like you’re sharing with your best friend and a stranger is important. You want the openness of sharing with your best friend, but the explanations like you’re sharing with a stranger.

As A Reader

All of the work does not fall on the poet to create a connected reading experience. To enjoy the act of reading, it helps to step back and give the poet the benefit of the doubt. When a reader enters into a poem with an open mind, expecting the poem to meet their level of entertainment, it can be self-fulfilling. Here are some questions we can ask ourselves to help ensure we’re not hyper-critical.

  1. How does this relate to my life?
  2. What is the poet doing to make this poem imaginative?
  3. Why did the poet use [that word]?
  4. How would I translate [that] stanza into my own words?
  5. Where do I think this is taking place?
  6. When do I think this is happening in the speaker’s life?
  7. Who is the poet trying to connect with?
  8. What turn of phrase do I like the best?
  9. What is the poet trying to tell me?
  10. What would I tell the poet if I met them?
  11. What part do I really like? Why do I like it?

These questions can help keep us looking at the positive aspects of the poem rather than the negative, but it also leads to some good critiques. The best critiques of poems point out things that the writer did well and things that they can improve upon in your opinion.

If we look at questions 2, 4, 9, 11, and 12 we can see that each of these questions have the potential for being answered negatively. If the poet isn’t working very much on imaginative poetry, than 2 is a place to talk about that, and how to improve upon that. 4 is a chance to look at the clarity of the poem and if it makes sense to you. 9 is also looking at the clarity of the poem, but from a different perspective. Eleven helps the reader consider why the poem elicits a strong reaction. Instead of talking about a stanza or word, some of these questions ask about the big picture. Some others probe into questions about the style of the poem.

puzzle-1487340_1280.jpgPoetry is ultimately about our experiences as people, piecing together our own feelings, and it is best to approach poems with that in mind. How does the poem relate to me? What in the poem relates it to something in my life? If you feel an emotional reaction, something relates.

Once we feel that, we are more likely to read the poem with a kinder eye. If we have a personal experience called up in our minds, we can read the poem looking at that personal experience, and, from there, talk about what we liked and didn’t like and why. That makes us think and it might make us aware of some inner truth or demon we rarely bring out into the light.

Specifics in Poetry: Challenge

Starting out as a young poet, we are told to write about our experiences, but at the time, our experiences are things like “I got in the car today” and “I put my hair up in a pony tail for the first time” or things that are too general to really make a good poem.

I had a poet who came into my third grade class to encourage our poetic ingenuity, and she had us write a structured poem. It was an “I am …” poem. Here is what I learned from the experience.

  1. You are a lot more than you think you are.
  2. You don’t have to keep writing “I am” at the beginning of every line
  3. “I am” can be followed by verbs rather than noun phrases, like “on” or “at”

This became my first experience with the phrase “not specific enough” which I’ve come to use as a mantra for new poets I run into on sites like Young Writers Society and Poetry Soup. So what does it mean?

When something is not specific enough it means that the details the poet chose for their poem don’t explore something personal enough to make a good poem. It could be that the poem is about a romantic experience, but it could be about anyone’s romance, or it could be that the poem has nothing to do with any one person at all. It becomes a spectrum of “unrelatable” and “too easy to write” and your job as a poet is to find the happy medium.

What can you talk about that is relatable because of personal experience, but not too detailed and exclusionary?

Taking the Dive

I can’t say I’m good at “taking the dive” in the figurative or literal sense. If you put me on a diving board, I’ll just stand there and wonder why the stairs aren’t a better way to enter the water. I’m frozen by my fears. My flight or fight response is broken. When faced with something that terrifies me, I do not try to fight it, because I am sure I will lose, and I do not try to run from it, for fear it will chase me.

In this way, I’m always on a diving platform staring down at the water from above, waiting for someone to push me in so I can go without needing the courage to jump.

I would talk at nauseum about what recent jumps I’ve been forced to take, or those I’m still waiting on, but this is, at it’s heart, a blog about getting better at poetry from one person who’s gotten only 3 poems published to millions of people who aren’t listening, and a handful of you who are curious enough to humor me. So instead, I think it would be more interesting for us few in the wings of millions, to talk about language.

That’s what we’re here for after all.

Figurative language is the art of finding something physical or so well known that when you say an example, the example doesn’t need any explanation. Usually these are all very old examples, and we’ve come to know some phrases over time rather than remembering the example, but the results are the same.

“Take the plunge”, “take the dive”, “take the jump”, they’re all the same example, leaping off of something either with or without knowing the results, and doing it with your full body, putting death on the line. People use this expression to say “go for it” or “don’t fear the results, do it anyway” and for me this can be a powerful encouragement, or a reminder of what I was avoiding in the first place. So how can we use figurative language to support our poems?

Simple, make our own. The idea of “take the dive” is the trepidation which stops us from moving forward, it is the human inability to perform when being faced with a challenge greater than they think is worth the risks. The saying is meant to say that “I took a chance” and even though I didn’t like the risks, I did it anyway with all of my effort.

From there, now that we know what it means, we can come up with our own. Think of something that stops you in your tracks every time, and ask yourself what you are least likely to do with that situation. Be careful now, we don’t want people dead, so if you’re thinking “pet the lion” or “step on the tracks in front of a train” back it off a step or two.

For me, my non-deadly thing I don’t do is touch spiders. I am creeped out by them with their long legs and quick movements. Because of that, instead of saying “take the dive” I could say “touch the spider.” I stood petrified until I touched the spider, and now, everything is fine.

There are a few things to be careful with. First, you don’t want to confuse people. If it isn’t clear why it is something which matches with the original saying, then add in context clues. Second, if it doesn’t fit with the poem you’re writing, add in context clues. If you’re not sure what I mean by context clues, restate your intent in another way, or give the reader a chance to understand by what else is being said.

Now, if you want to take me up on it, write a short poem with an idiom or phrase you replaced, and comment, give me a link or how to find it, and I’ll give you a review!

I look forward to reading your work.